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  • Eyewear Gives Thanks For These Six American Poets This November

    Eyewear Publishing continues to develop its trans-Atlantic mission of publishing American and Canadian poets so they can reach a wider audience in the UK and Ireland, and vice versa. We are very humbled and pleased to announce as this American Thanksgiving arrives, that we will be publishing the following six American poets in the next 12-18 months, each adding to the rich poetic diversity of our list.

    Janet Kaplan

    Janet Kaplan’s previous titles are Dreamlife of a Philanthropist: Prose Poems & Prose Sonnets, winner of the 2011 Ernest Sandeen Prize (University of Notre Dame Press), The Glazier’s Country, winner of the 2003 Poets Out Loud Prize (Fordham University Press) and The Groundnote (Alice James Books, 1998). Her honors include grants from the New York Foundation for the Arts and the Bronx Council on the Arts, fellowships and residencies from Yaddo, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, the Ucross Foundation and the Vermont Studio Center. Her work has appeared in Arts & Letters, Barrow Street, Cross Currents, Denver Quarterly, Interim, The Paris Review, Pool, The Prose Poem Project, Sentence, The Southampton Review, Tupelo Quarterly, Zarf and many others, as well as in the anthologies An Introduction to the Prose Poem (Firewheel Editions, 2007) and Lit from Inside: 40 Years of Poetry from Alice James (Alice James Books, 2012). She has served as Poet-in-Residence at Fordham University and is a long-standing member of the creative writing faculty at Hofstra University, where she edits the digital literary magazine AMP.

     

    Ricky Ray

    Ricky Ray was born in Florida and educated at Columbia University. He is the founding editor of the journal Rascal and his work appears in numerous periodicals on both sides of the pond, including The American Scholar, Fugue, The Georgetown Review, Amaryllis, Concis and One. His awards include the Fortnight Poetry Prize, the Ron McFarland Poetry Prize and Katexic's Cormac McCarthy Prize. He has performed alongside such luminaries as Saul Williams and currently lives in Manhattan. Pulitzer laureate Claudia Emerson lauded his work "for its inventiveness, lyricism and mystery," and admired "the way it works with memory and finally catches memory off its guard."

     

    Elizabeth Lindsey Rogers

    Elizabeth Lindsey Rogers's debut poetry collection, Chord Box (University of Arkansas Press, 2013), selected for the Miller Williams Series, was a finalist for the 2014 Lambda Literary Award. Her poems have appeared in Boston Review, The Missouri Review, FIELD, Guernica, Crazyhorse, Blackbird, Washington Square, and elsewhere. Her creative nonfiction essays can be found in Best American Nonrequired Reading 2017, Best American Travel Writing 2017, The Missouri Review, Prairie Schooner, and elsewhere. She received the 2012-2014 Kenyon Review Fellowship. Rogers is currently the Murphy Visiting Fellow in English-Creative Writing at Hendrix College. She is also a contributing editor for the Kenyon Review and a volunteer for the Veterans' Writing Project.

    Sue Hyon Bae

    Sue Hyon Bae was raised in South Korea, Malaysia, and Texas. She received her MFA from Arizona State University. Her co-translation of Kim Hyesoon’s A Cup of Red Mirror will be published by Action Books in 2018. She lives in Sacramento.

    Anthony Desmond

    Anthony Desmond is a twenty-five-year-old Detroit born writer & poet. Desmond's poetry can be found in magazines and anthologies, including: What is Inspiration: Thoughts on Life Series Vol. 1, Railroad Poetry Magazine, The Rusty Nail Magazine; Recipes for Hemlock (anthology from Boston Poetry Magazine), Signal from Static: a collection of modern poetry & The d'Verse Anthology: Voices of Contemporary World Poetry. His debut pamphlet will come from Eyewear in early 2018.

    Steve Kronen

    Steve Kronen's previous collections are Splendor , (BOA) and Empirical Evidence, (University of Georgia Press). His work has appeared in The New Republic, The American Scholar, Poetry, Agni, APR, Little Star, The Georgia Review, Ploughshares, Slate, The Yale Review, the New Statesman, and The Threepenny Review. He has received an NEA, three Florida Individual Artist fellowships, the Cecil Hemley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, the James Boatwright Prize from Shenandoah, and fellowships from Bread Loaf, and the Sewanee Writers’ Conferences. He received an MFA from Warren Wilson College. He is a librarian in Miami, Florida, where he lives with his wife, novelist Ivonne Lamazares (The Sugar Island), and their daughter Sophie.

  • AMERICAN POET STEVE KRONEN IN MIAMI RESPONDS TO IRMA

    EYE OF THE POET - IN THE EYE OF IRMA

    BY STEVE KRONEN

    Hurricane Irma -  9:42 AM, SATURDAY September 9, 2017

    The outer bands of Hurricane Irma are whipping about Miami now - some wind and rain, but no worse than a healthy storm at this point. We put up our shutters a few days ago and have been anxiously, fearfully, watching Irma's progress on TV. Irma is about 3X the width of Fla and an unprecedented Category 5 (no one conceived of a Category 6). It was to hit Miami directly but now seems on its way to Florida's west coast and then, horribly, up Florida, into Georgia, and northward (thankfully not to Houston). Much of the Caribbean islands and some of Cuba have been razed.

    Ivonne and I stocked up on canned goods (the grocery store was surprisingly mostly stocked and orderly), have filled the bathtub, froze water (to be placed in the fridge once the electricity goes - an old fashioned ice box!), batteried up a radio, placed flashlights in easy reach, removed debris and recycling and garbage bins (potential missiles) from around the house, drove Ivonne's car to a public garage, helped friends put up plywood over their windows (the heat is enervating), wedged plastic bags under the doors as an impotent stay against the expected flooding, and now wait.

    This is our 5th or 6th hurricane, but we've never been this frightened. We considered getting out of Dodge, but the thought of running out of gas on the turnpike amidst thousands of panicked drivers scared us slightly more than Irma herself. And where does one go when Irma can arrive there a day later (though dissipated by land). Ditto the airport where we heard reports of stranded, desperate people trying to get out at obscenely inflated prices (a kind of first world fall of Saigon).

     We are fortunate. We are in, what I am hoping, is a safe house - books at hand, showers still working, our own bed....Tens of thousands of scared Miamians are packed into chaotic shelters hoping that their houses still stand once the storm has passed.

    Harvey, Irma, and Fill in the Blank, I fear, are mere harbingers of what to expect each year as the oceans grow warmer and our nation is ruled by a swaggering Il Duce narcissist and a GOP determined to inflate its own sense of self-worth at the expense of an ever-depleted middle-class and poor, even to the point of denying simple science. 

    Battening down my hatches,

    Steve Kronen

     

    ***

    Monday 9/11/17 11:40 AM

    Strange American date to feel this much relief. Irma has passed (us). Saturday it shifted even farther west and Miami was beyond its wide scything cone. Some deus ex machina instead of Irma herself had descended and that same deus was now directing a different sort of machinery against Naples and Ft Myers (Winston Smith: "Do it to Julia!"). A 15-foot sea surge, according to reports, was to turn the lower half of Tampa into Atlantis. In the end, Tampa, like Miami, suffered only a "glancing blow."

    Cone or not, Irma is huge. We spent yesterday reading and writing by flashlight and candle light, listening to a ferocious rain drum the shutters. This morning I opened the first floor shutters and windows. Instead of water, air and light flooded the house. Outside, branches and detritus littered the walkways and streets. A tremendous tree, uprooted nearby, blocked egress but missed a neighbor's house. Tornadoes had swept through other neighborhoods.

    Now someone's personal generator sawblades the air. Last night, safe in our bed, we opened our bedroom's shutters and windows. No lights shone beyond our palm trees. No airplanes zippered the sky. No one chattered from our TV. We fell asleep in peace.

    Tropical storm Irma, as I write, shoulders its way past Jacksonville and Tallahassee into Georgia. Ivonne and I in our selfish hearts are grateful -- selves and property are unharmed. Someone else, somewhere else, is picking up the pieces.

     

    Steve's collections are Splendor , (BOA) and Empirical Evidence, (University of Georgia Press). His work has appeared in The New Republic, The American Scholar, Poetry, Agni, APR, Little Star, The Georgia Review, Ploughshares, Slate, The Yale Review, the  New Statesman, and The Threepenny Review.  He has received an NEA, three Florida Individual Artist fellowships, the Cecil Hemley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, the James Boatwright Prize from Shenandoah, and fellowships from Bread Loaf, and the Sewanee Writers’ Conferences. He received an MFA from Warren Wilson College.

    He is a librarian in Miami, Florida, where he lives with his wife, novelist Ivonne Lamazares (The Sugar Island), and their daughter Sophie.

  • Faisal Mohyuddin Wins the 2017 Sexton Prize for Poetry

    CHICAGO HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER WINS LEADING UK POETRY BOOK PRIZE

    THE SEXTON PRIZE, JUDGED THIS YEAR BY MAJOR POET KIMIKO HAHN, HAS BEEN WON BY Faisal Mohyuddin, for his debut poetry collection The Displaced Children of Displaced Children 

    Mohyuddin's work was selected from a remarkably diverse and competitive shortlist. His prize will be $1000 USD, and publication by British, London-based independent publishing house, Eyewear – and his book will be distributed across the USA by SPD and in the UK and Ireland by Central Books. 

    Final Judge Professor Hahn - Distinguished Professor, English Department MFA in Creative Writing & Literary Translation Queens College, The City University of New York - said of the winning book: “Mohyuddin's craft is composed of measurable touches that go hardly noticed. And the subject! Serious stuff , yes, but the collection contains a variety of tones and concerns. There is the jelly-fish in space (lament though the poem may be), a talking banana, binging on pumpkin pie. To be sure, the title refers to diaspora and the poems refer to families in and immigrants from Pakistan. There are a literal landscapes and clear memories to be enjoyed. And yet, because these poems are so well crafted and the emotion so well expressed, the subject matter is overtaken by such themes as boundary, legacy, loss, claim. Whether a long narrative poem, or shorter lyric poems, these are the works of a poet, mature in his concerns and thinking.” 

    Mohyuddin had this reaction to his win: “For years I have turned to Kimiko Hahn’s poetry to find beauty, inspiration, love, and, above all, a feeling of home. Few poets’ work moves me the way her work moves me. So when I learned Professor Hahn had selected my collection as the winner of the 2017 Sexton Prize, I was incredibly honored, elated, and quite honestly flabbergasted. This is undoubtedly an amazing honor, the depths of which I cannot fully grasp. For that, I am profoundly grateful to Professor Hahn and to everyone at Eyewear.” 

    Faisal Mohyuddin is the author of the chapbook The Riddle of Longing, forthcoming Fall 2017 from Backbone Press. He is the recipient of the 2014 Edward Stanley Award from Prairie Schooner, and his work has also appeared in Narrative, RHINO, Catamaran, Chicago Quarterly Review, Poet Lore, Crab Orchard Review, Atlanta Review, and elsewhere. New work is forthcoming in The Missouri Review, Painted Bride Quarterly, and the anthology Misrepresented People: Poets Respond to Trump’s America. A graduate of Carleton College, Northwestern University, and Columbia College Chicago, and an alumnus of the U.S. Department of State’s Teachers for Global Classrooms fellowship, Faisal teaches English at Highland Park High School in Illinois and lives with his wife and son in Chicago.  He is a proud American Muslim of Pakistani descent.

    Eyewear books was founded in 2012 by Cambridge writer-in-residence Dr Todd Swift, and publishes works by leading poets, including Paul Muldoon, George Szirtes, Rebecca Gayle Howell, George Elliott Clarke, Hester Knibbe, Sumia Sukkar, Don Share, Keaton Henson, Jan Owen, Mark Ford and Elspeth Smith. 

    The runners- up are:

    The Tilt Torn Away from the Seasons by Elizabeth Lindsey Rogers

    Truce Country by Sue Hyon Bae 

    They will both be offered a publishing contract for Eyewear and a $200 USD advance as their prize. Of these Judge Hanh said: “In a very rich and complex grouping of brilliant collections, these still stood out for me.” 

    Mohyuddin’s book will be published in early 2018 in time for AWP, and will be formally launched in London sometime next year. 

    Last year's winner was American Purgatory, selected by Don Share, and written by Rebecca Gayle Howell. It was an indie best-seller this past year.

  • ANNOUNCING A SUPERB 16-STRONG SEXTON POETRY PRIZE SHORTLIST

    THE SEXTON POETRY PRIZE SHORTLIST 2017

    The following 16 American poets have been selected by the Eyewear editorial team panel (Todd Swift, Rosanna Hildyard and Alexandra Payne) from over 300 submissions of seriousness and quality submitted for the 2nd annual Sexton Poetry Prize.  Last year's winner was selected by celebrated US poet and Poetry magazine editor Don Share, and was American Purgatory, by Rebecca Gayle Howell. It has become a critically-acclaimed indie bestseller.
    This year's winner will be selected by the Final Judge, professor Kimiko Hahn, a major American poet, and announced no later than this autumn. The book will be published in spring 2018, and sold in the UK, EU, and North America, and entered for relevant prizes on at least two continents. The winner also receives a generous cash prize of $1,000 USD. This is a transparent shortlist, and none of the 16 poets are closely affiliated with the Final Judge.
    This year was if anything even more competitive than last. The panel of judges were able to establish a longlist of around 32 manuscripts (roughly 10% of the overall submission list) that were extraordinarily accomplished, and all worthy of publication. Once we had this list, we had the rather glum task of winnowing down to a final list of no more than 16. We can only say that it was a privilege, and a genuine eye-opener, to have the opportunity to read so many superb American contemporary poets, across all career stages, from young to old, emerging to very established.  American poetry is clearly in a new renaissance period.
    The poetics at play in these 16 manuscripts are richly varied, and the poets are diverse. We sought gender parity as a given. Generally, at least half the collections are experimental, or avant-garde, and many are concerned with issues that are of vital significance in 2017 - including feminism, ecology, politics, LGBTQ issues, post-colonialism, identity, and concerns for social justice (as well as intersections of these and others)  - but never at the expense of a focus on the need to be interested in language as the field of play. In short, these collections represent works of integrity, commitment, intelligence, and often verbal or formal brilliance. Nor is there a marked absence of wit or irony. Eyewear will be pleased and proud to publish any which the judge selects as the winner, as they are all top-notch.
    Here is the list of poets (with title of their collection below in the bios) in alphabetic order by first name.
    1. A. Loudermilk

    2. A.J. Odasso  

    3. Christopher Kondrich

    4. Dustin Pearson

    5. Elizabeth Lindsey Rogers

    6. Faisal Mohyuddin

    7. Janet Kaplan

    8. Jennifer K. Dick

    9. Jenny Browne

    10. John James

    11. Kathleen Winter

    12. Melissa Barrett

    13. Rose Knapp

    14. Steve Kronen

    15. Sue Hyon Bae

    16. Tim Wood

    We wish all the final shortlisted poets good luck.

    Here are their self-submitted biographies, and title of their collection, in caps after:

      A. Loudermilk’s publications date back to the 1990s, when Mark Doty introduced him as a new voice in The James White Review. His poems can be found in dozens more reviews, like Tin House, Gargoyle, Smartish Pace, and Mississippi Review, plus his debut book Strange Valentine. His cultural criticism has been featured in the Writer’s Chronicle, PopMatters, the UK-based Polari Magazine, and Journal of International Women’s Studies for which he wrote their most downloaded article “Nina Simone and the Civil Rights Movement”; his website on personality-driven films is called Quirky Cinema. He’s taught creative writing at Maryland Institute College of Arts in Baltimore and Hampshire College in Amherst. His site can be found here. GALL & BULLHORN

       

      A.J. Odasso's poetry has appeared in an eclectic variety of publications, including Sybil's Garage, Mythic Delirium, Midnight Echo, Not One of Us, Dreams & Nightmares, Goblin Fruit, Strange Horizons, Stone Telling, Farrago's Wainscot, Liminality, Battersea Review, Barking Sycamores, and New England Review of Books. Her début collection, Lost Books (Flipped Eye Publishing) was a finalist for the 2011 People's Book Prize. Her second collection with Flipped Eye, The Dishonesty of Dreams, was released in 2014. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing (Poetry) from Boston University, where she was a 2015-2016 Teaching Fellow, and currently works in the Honors College at the University of New Mexico. She has served in the Poetry Department at Strange Horizons since 2012, where she presently holds the title of Senior Editor.  She also serves as Treasurer to the Science Fiction & Fantasy Poetry Association. THINGS BEING WHAT THEY ARE 

       

      Christopher Kondrich is the author of Contrapuntal (Free Verse Editions, 2013). He is the winner of The Iowa Review Award for Poetry (selected by Srikanth Reddy), and The Paris-American Reading Series Prize. Recent poems appear or are forthcoming in Antioch Review, Boston Review, Crazyhorse, Poetry Northwest, The Iowa Review, The Kenyon Review, Third Coast and Web Conjunctions. He is an Associate Editor of 32 Poems, and an instructor for the Lighthouse Writers Workshop and Frequency Writers. More information at christopherkondrich.com. VALUING

       

      Dustin Pearson earned his MFA from Arizona State University, where he also served as the editor of Hayden's Ferry Review. He was awarded the 2015 Katharine C. Turner Prize from the Academy of American Poets for his poem "The Black Body Auditions for a Play." He is the recipient of fellowships from the Watering Hole, Cave Canem, and the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing. Born in Charleston, he is from Summerville, SC. MILLENIAL ROOST

       

      Elizabeth Lindsey Rogers’s debut poetry collection, Chord Box (University of Arkansas Press, 2013), was the 2013 Miller Prize finalist and a finalist for the 2014 Lambda Literary Award.  Her poems appear in The Missouri Review, Boston Review, FIELD, Washington Square, Guernica, Crazyhorse, and in many other journals; her creative nonfiction appears in Best American Nonrequired Reading, Best American Travel Writing, Prairie Schooner, The Missouri Review, and elsewhere. She was a 2012-2014 Kenyon Review Fellow.  She is the Murphy Visiting Fellow at Hendrix College and a volunteer for the Veterans’ Writing Project. THE TILT TORN AWAY FROM THE SEASONS

       

      Faisal Mohyuddin teaches English at Highland Park High School in suburban Chicago and serves as an educator adviser to Narrative 4, an international not-for-profit dedicated to fostering empathy through the exchange of stories. A graduate of Carleton College, Northwestern University, and Columbia College Chicago, Faisal is a recent U.S.-Senegal fellow in the U.S. State Department's Teachers for Global Classrooms program. His poems have appeared in many publications, including Prairie Schooner, Narrative, RHINO, Crab Orchard Review, Catamaran, Chicago Quarterly Review, Poet Lore, Atlanta Review, the minnesota review, and Indivisible: An Anthology of Contemporary South Asian American Poetry (University of Arkansas Press). New work is forthcoming in Painted Bride Quarterly and in the anthology Misrepresented People: Poetic Responses to Trump's America (New York Quarterly Books). The recipient of the 2014 Edward Stanley Award from Prairie Schooner and a finalist in Narrative's Eight Annual Poetry Contest in 2016, Faisal lives with his wife and son in Chicago. His site is here. THE DISPLACED CHILDREN OF DISPLACED CHILDREN

       

      Janet Kaplan’s previous full-length poetry collections are The Groundnote (Alice James Books), The Glazier’s Country (Poets Out Loud prizewinner, Fordham University Press) and Dreamlife of a Philanthropist (Ernest Sandeen prizewinner in poetry, U. of Notre Dame Press). Her honors include grants from the New York Foundation for the Arts and the Bronx Council on the Arts, fellowships and residencies from Yaddo, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, the Ucross Foundation and the Vermont Studio Center. Her poems have appeared in Barrow Street, Cross Currents, Denver Quarterly, Interim, The Paris Review, Pool, Sentence, The Southampton Review, Tupelo Quarterly, Yellow Field, Zarf (Wales) and many others, as well as in such anthologies as An Introduction to the Prose Poem (Firewheel Editions, 2009) and Lit from Inside: 40 Years of Poetry from Alice James (Alice James Books, 2012). She has served as Poet-in-Residence at Fordham University and is a member of the creative writing faculty at Hofstra University, where she edits the digital literary magazine AMP.  ECOTONES

       

      Jennifer K. Dick, (born 1970) is an American poet, translator and educator/scholar born in Minnesota, raised in Iowa and currently living in Mulhouse, France. She has been classified as a post-L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E school poet and, by Amy Catanzano, as a U+F+O+L+A+N+G+U+A+G+E[1] poet with a strong background in lyric and narrative tradition. She has taught American Literature, Creative Writing, and English and since 2009 has been a Maître de Conférences at the Université de Haute Alsace in Mulhouse, France. Her doctoral research for her PhD completed under the direction of Jean Bessière at the Université de Paris III: La Sorbonne Nouvelle in 2009 and critical writings on contemporary cross-genre poets and prose authors are in the field of Comparative Literature with an accent on Visual studies, Modernism, Postmodernism and the Avant-garde, including work on Susan Howe, Myung Mi Kim, Anne-Marie Albiach, Claude Royet-Journoud, Lisa Jarnot, and Maurice Roche. Dick also holds a Master of Fine Arts in poetry from Colorado State University where she worked with Laura Mullen. THAT WHICH I TOUCH HAS NO NAME

       

      Jenny Browne is the author of three collections of poems, At Once, The Second Reason and Dear Stranger and two chapbooks, Welcome to Freetown and Texas, Being. A former James Michener Fellow in Poetry at the University of Texas-Austin, she has received the Cecil Hemley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Poetry and two creative writing fellowships from the Texas Writers League. Her poems and essays have appeared in numerous publications including American Poetry Review, Boston Review, Gulf Coast, Oxford American, The New York Times and Tin House.  She teaches at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas and is the 2017-18 Texas State Poet Laureate. CRASH SURVIVABLE MEMORY UNIT

       

      John James is the author of Chthonic, winner of the 2014 CutBank Chapbook Prize. His poems appear or are forthcoming in Boston Review, Kenyon Review, West Branch, Poetry Northwest, Best American Poetry 2017, and elsewhere. He lives in Washington, DC, where he teaches at the Potomac School and directs Georgetown University Summer Programs’ Creative Writing Institute. THE MILK HOURS

       

      Kathleen Winter's second book, I will not kick my friends, won the 2017 Elixir Poetry Prize. Her debut collection, Nostalgia for the Criminal Past, won the 2013 Texas Institute of Letters first book award. Her poems have been published or are forthcoming in The New Statesman, Yale Review, Prairie Schooner, Cincinnati Review, Poetry London, Tin House, The New Republic and AGNI.  She has received fellowships from the Dobie Paisano Ranch, Austin; Dora Maar House, Provence; the James Merrill House; Cill Rialaig Retreat, Ireland; and Vermont Studio Center.  She won the 2014 Rochelle Ratner Memorial Award and the 2016 Poetry Society of America Emily Dickinson Award.  Winter teaches writing and literature in Northern California. I WANNA DESTROY YOU

       

      Melissa Barrett's poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in BOMB, Harvard Review, Crazyhorse, Gulf Coast, the Iowa Review, and Best American Poetry. She lives in Columbus, Ohio and works at a middle school. You can find her online here. MOON ON ROAM

       

      Rose Knapp is a poet and producer. She has publications in Lotus-Eater, Bombay Gin, BlazeVOX, Hotel Amerika, Gargoyle, and others.​ She has a chapbook with Hesterglock Press and a forthcoming collection with Dostoyevsky Wannabe. She lives in Los Angeles. Her work can be found at roseknapp.net METEMPOIESIS

       

      Steve Kronen’s previous collections are Splendor (BOA) and Empirical Evidence, (University of Georgia Press). His work has appeared in The New Republic, Poetry, The American Scholar, AGNI, The American Poetry Review, Little Star, The Georgia Review, Ploughshares, Slate, The Yale Review, New Statesman, Poetry Daily, and The Threepenny Review. A graduate of Warren Wilson’s MFA program, he has received an NEA, three Florida Individual Artist fellowships, the Cecil Hemley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, the James Boatwright Poetry Prize from Shenandoah, and fellowships from Bread Loaf, and the Sewanee Writers’ Conferences. He is a librarian in Miami where he lives with his wife, novelist Ivonne Lamazares, and their daughter. His website is www.stevekronen.com HOMAGE TO MISTRESS OPPENHEIMER

       

      Sue Hyon Bae was raised in South Korea, Malaysia and Texas and received an MFA from Arizona State University. Her co-translation of Kim Hyesoon’s A Cup of Red Mirror will be published by Action Books in 2018. She lives in Sacramento. TRUCE COUNTRY

       

      Tim Wood is the author of two books of poems, Otherwise Known as Home (BlazeVOX, 2010) and Notched Sunsets (Atelos, 2016). He is also co-editor of The Hip Hop Reader (Longman, 2008). He was the 2017 winner of SLAB Magazine’s Elizabeth Curry poetry contest, and first runner-up of RHINO Magazine’s 2017 Founder’s Award. His work was also selected by Abiodun Oyewole, an original member of The Last Poets, for inclusion in the anthology Black Lives Have Always Mattered, A Collection of Essays, Poems, and Personal Narratives. His critical work on poetry and poetics can be found at ActionYes.org, Jacket2.org, and floorjournal.com as well as in Convolution and Leviathan; his poetry reviews can be found at the Colorado Review, The Iowa Review, and the Boston Review. A Fulbright scholar at the University of Tübingen in Germany from 2013 to 2014, he is currently a professor of English at SUNY Nassau Community College in Garden City, New York. ANTHOLOGY OF EXISTENCES