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  • Richard Georges Will Judge the 2018 Beverly Prize for Eyewear!

    Eyewear Publishing is honoured to have Richard Georges as the 2018 judge for one of the most eclectic and international of new literary prizes, which we offer, the Beverly Prize, now in its third year.

    Richard Georges is a writer, editor, and lecturer in the British Virgin Islands. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Prelude, Smartish Pace, Barrelhouse, The Caribbean Writer, The Puritan, The Poetry Review, WILDNESS, Wasafiri, decomP, The Rusty Toque, Baldhip, Susumba, Under the Radar, sx salon, those that this, Reservoir, L’Ephemere Review, Cordite Poetry Review, The 2018 Forward Book of Poetry and elsewhere. Richard is the author of the poetry collections Make Us All Islands (Shearsman Books) and GIANT (Platypus Press).

    He is the recipient of the 2016 Marvin E. Williams Literary Prize from The Caribbean Writer, and has been shortlisted for The Wasafiri New Writing Prize, The Small Axe Literary Prize, The Hollick Arvon Prize for Caribbean Literature, and the Forward Prize for Best First Collection. He holds a BA in English from Texas Christian University, an MA in Creative Writing from Aberystwyth University, and a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing from the University of Sussex. He chairs the Humanities Department at H. Lavity Stoutt Community College and is also a founding editor of Moko, a journal of Caribbean arts and letters.

  • POET DAVID HALE WINS THE INTERNATIONAL BEVERLY PRIZE IN ITS SECOND YEAR

    David Hale is the winner of the 2018 Beverly Prize, organized by Eyewear Publishing and open to outstanding works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry or criticism, from authors writing in English based anywhere in the world. His collection of poetry, Dancing Under A Bloodless Moon, selected by distinguished Canadian critic and poet, Dr Bruce Meyer, will be published by Eyewear next year. The prize also comes with a £500 advance.

    David Hale (pictured) was born in Scotland, and currently lives in Gloucestershire, where he passes the time by teaching, setting type, looking after horses and making things. He has two pamphlets out, one from Happenstance and another from Templar. This will be his debut collection.

    The judge said of this work: "This is a superb collection of impeccably crafted poems. Hale writes of a world of journeys, mysteriously death-like train travel, in haunting lines that are both melodic and powerfully concrete. I don't think there is a bad line in the entire book. I don't think there is a bad poem in the entire book.

    This is a classic collection that draws the reader in, and that leaves a ghostly and almost ethereal afterglow not only with each poem but with the collection as a whole. This is a book worthy of the Beverly Prize. It is a work of high distinction and incredible artistry."

    The Runner-Up is Yusuf DeLorenzo for his mystery novel set in Algiers. He worked and studied abroad for 25 years in North Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent. On returning to Fez, Morocco, the last functional medieval city in the world, he began thinking of North Africa as the ideal setting for a sleuth in the midst of the Barbary Pirates. He is presently at work on the seventh book in the series, the first of which placed second in the Royal Palms Literary Awards of the Florida Writers Association.

    The Beverly Prize is unusual for its range and scope, and its large shortlists - this year the winner competed against 17 other shortlisted authors from around the world to win. Last year's winner, Sohini Basak, lives in India, and will be in London on July 5th to launch her debut, at the London Review Bookshop. 

    The prize is named after Beverly Swift, a Quebec-born lawyer and academic, whose passion for books, sense of humour, and compassion for animals, was widely known. She died of cancer over a decade ago and this prize memorialises her.

  • KAVEH AKBAR JUDGE OF THE INAUGURAL FRANZ WRIGHT PRIZE

    KAVEH AKBAR IS JUDGE OF THE INAUGURAL FRANZ WRIGHT POETRY PRIZE

    EYEWEAR PUBLISHING is excited to announce a new prize named for Franz Wright. Pulitzer-winning poet Franz Wright was the author of over twenty collections of original poetry and six volumes of translations, and passed away from cancer in 2015. This prize is intended to honour his inestimable contribution to poetry, and support poets of any age and nationality in his memory.

    Wright is unique in that he is filial half of the only father/son pairing to have won the Pulitzer Prize in the same category (with his father, James Wright). Born in Vienna and raised in America, he graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Oberlin College in 1977. During his illustrious career he was the recipient of a Whiting Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. He taught at Emerson College, among other universities, and his published works include Walking to Martha’s Vineyard, God’s Silence and most recently The Toy Throne, which was published by Tungsten Press in 2016. He was also known for his work in the field of mental health.

    The Franz Wright Prize for Poetry is open to submissions from poets of all ages, backgrounds, education levels, citizenship statuses, and nationalities: anyone can enter any manuscript. The only stipulations are that the manuscript must be in English, original, unpublished, not translated. Submissions must be 40 pages or more in length.

    The winner will receive $2000, and will be published by Eyewear on March 18th, 2019 – which would have been Wright’s 66th birthday. Submissions will open on January 1st, 2018, and close June 1st, 2018. Kaveh Akbar will judge the prize in its first year.

    Akbar is the author of the chapbook Portrait of the Alcoholic (Sibling Rivalry Press, January 2017); his first collection Calling a Wolf a Wolf was published in the US by Alice James Books in September 2017, and will be published in the UK by Penguin in February 2018. Born in Tehran, he is currently a professor at Purdue University’s MFA program and Randolph College. He is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and a Lucille Medwick Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, as well as the Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation. Akbar is also the founder and editor of Divedapper, which conducts interviews with major voices in contemporary poetry.

     

    Kaveh pictured

    Dr Todd Swift, Publishing Director of Eyewear, says “We are very grateful to Franz Wright’s estate for this incredible honour, and thrilled to launch this prize in recognition of Franz’s support of poetry. Eyewear has always championed a diverse range of voices in poetry, and are proud to be taking submissions from poets of any age, from all over the world. Kaveh will make a wonderful judge for this first iteration, and we’re sure he’ll have many fantastic manuscripts to choose from.”

     

    ENTER HERE: 

    https://eyewearpublishing.submittable.com/submit/104205/the-franz-wright-prize-for-poetry

     

    Photo credit for Franz Wright: Elizabeth Oehlkers Wright

  • ANNOUNCING OUR GREAT 12-STRONG HUME PRIZE SHORTLIST

    THE MELITA HUME POETRY PRIZE 2017 SHORTLIST

    This year’s shortlist of 12 eligible poets is likely more diverse than ever in the prize’s six-year history. Past winners have been chosen by leading UK poets, such as Tim Dooley, Emily Berry, and Mark Ford – and last year’s co-winner, Maria Apichella, was a Forward-nominee this year for Psalmody. The £1,500 prize is open to any young poet with a debut collection, 35 years or under at time of entry, who either is resident in the UK or Ireland, or a citizen of either place. This allows for a very open field.

    This year’s judge Vahni Capildeo, a prize-winning leading poet, will have her work cut out for her. There are poets from across the UK, Ireland and Northern Ireland, as well as two poets hailing from South Africa. Showcasing the internationalism of poetry in these isles, some of the shortlisted poets live at least part-time in Mumbai, Barcelona and Hong Kong. And all styles and forms of poetry are represented, from avant-garde, to mainstream, to spoken word and performance. 

    The 12 debut poets are:

    Alex Howard is 29 and lives in Scotland. Alex attended the University of Edinburgh where he graduated with a first in English Literature. Since then, he has gone on to publish poetry and prose widely earning several prizes and awards. His debut novel Library Cat won the Beryl Bainbridge Best First Time Author Award (2017) and has been translated into Italian and Korean, while his poetry has earned him a place as a quarterfinalist in the Scottish Slam Championships, a reading slot at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, and the Red Cross International Writing Prize. He is currently completing an AHRC funded PhD at the University of Edinburgh where he teaches.

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    Caitlin Stobie was born in 1993 in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. She is currently reading for her PhD at the University of Leeds and is co-editor of EPIZOOTICS!  - and her poems and short stories have been published internationally in journals including Poetry & Audience, Zoomorphic, Flash, The Stockholm Review of Literature, The Kalahari Review, and New Contrast. In 2016 an earlier version of her unpublished debut collection was shortlisted for the RædLeaf International Poetry Award.

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    Carina Hart was born in Norfolk in 1987. She studied English Literature at Cambridge, York and UEA, where she completed her PhD in 2012. She has published poetry in InPrint, The Cadaverine and The Apple Anthology, and was also shortlisted for the Melita Hume Poetry Prize in 2013. In 2017 she has been highly commended in the Aurora Competition for short fiction, and is shortlisted for the Overton Poetry Prize. Carina works as a lecturer in English Literature at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, and lives in Nottingham and Malaysia.

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    Christian Wethered was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and the University of Bristol. He has been published both in Ireland and the UK. His work has featured in the anthologies In the Cinnamon Corners 2017 and the Aesthetica Creative Works Anthology. He was third-placed in the 2016 Café Writers Competition (judged by Andrew McMillan), and recently selected for the 2017 Poetry Ireland Introductions Series. He lives in Dublin.

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    Eloise Stevens was born in London, in 1988, and is currently based between Mumbai and London. She holds a degree in French and Portuguese literature from Oxford University. She has performed at The Cuckoo Club, Kala Ghoda Arts Festival, in Mumbai, the Edinburgh Fringe, the Poetry Café, London, and is a Farrago slam champion.  She is currently working on a performance of her collection, The Beat of Beast, which was shortlisted for The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective prize. 

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    Geraldine O’Kane poet, creative writing facilitator, arts administrator and mental health advocate, was born September 19th, 1981 and was brought up in the village of Ardboe on the shores of Lough Neagh, Northern Ireland. She attended St. Joseph's Grammar School Donaghmore, and went on to study English and History at the University of Ulster. She currently lives and works in Belfast. Geraldine is one half of Poetry NI. In October 2015 she gave a TED Talk for TEDx Belfast on poetry and mental health and read at the Poems Upstairs Series in association with Poetry Ireland Feb’ 2016. She is a recipient of the Artist Career Enhancement Scheme (ACES) 2015/16 grant from the Arts Council of Northern Ireland. 

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    Jacqueline Thompson is from Arbroath on the East Coast of Scotland. She has an MLitt in Creative Writing from The University of Dundee and a PhD from The University of Edinburgh. Her poems have appeared in New Writing Scotland, Gutter, Poetry Ireland Review and The Scotsman. She has been shortlisted for the Grierson Verse Prize, the Westport Arts Festival Poetry Prize and the Jane Martin Poetry Prize, and she won the Neil Gunn Writing Competition in 2017. She currently works as a writer in Edinburgh. 

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    Jason Eng Hun Lee is a poet of mixed British and Chinese ancestry. He has been published in EnvoiAcumen, Quarterly Literary Review Singapore, Cha: An Asian Literary Journal. He has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and his first collection Beds in the East was a finalist for the Hong Kong University Prize (2010). He is an occasional guest editor/judge/reviewer for Cha: An Asian Literary Journal and regular contributor to the Hong Kong literary scene. He has a PhD in English Literature and currently lectures at Hong Kong Baptist University. 

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    Mariah Whelan was born in Oxford in 1986. She studied English at Queen’s University, Belfast before completing an MSt in Creative Writing at Oxford University. She has lived in Japan and Spain and is currently based in the Centre for New Writing at The University of Manchester where she was awarded a scholarship to write poems and research trauma in contemporary Irish fiction. She was awarded a distinction for her master’s thesis, a novel-in-sonnets titled City of Rivers, which won the AM Heath Prize and individual poems were shortlisted for The Bridport Prize. 

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    Rebecca Close was born in London and is an artist, researcher, poet and translator based between London and Barcelona. She studied Philosophy at Manchester University and has a Master’s Degree in Spanish Philology. Her forthcoming new media publication Reinscriptions, co-produced with Anyely Marín, won the Miquel Casablancas Prize for Visual Arts (2017). Her poems have appeared recently in datableedzine, Ambit, Magma and Lemony Lemons.

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    Rhiannon Williams was born in Islington in 1992. She grew up in London and subsequently in Cyprus, where she lived for eight years before returning to the UK and studying for a BA in English Literature at the University of Exeter. She has had poetry featured on The Island Review, and is currently studying for an MA in Narrative Environments at Central Saint Martins in London. 

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    Thembe Mvula is a twenty-three-year-old poet and spoken word performer born in Grahamstown, South Africa. She has lived in the UK, in Gloucester, for almost fourteen years and is currently based in London, where she works part time in community engagement whilst being a freelance poet. Thembe graduated with a BA in Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies at the University of Kent in 2016. Writing from the age 12, Thembe had her first poem published in a Young Writers Anthology at age 15. Since then, she has mainly shared her poetry on the stage, featuring across platforms such as The Roundhouse, Jawdance and TEDx.