LOOK WHAT EYEWEAR IS UP TO NOW!

Eyewear hires a BAME editor to help promote diversity in British Publishing

Eyewear hires a BAME editor to help promote diversity in British Publishing

Eyewear is proud and delighted to welcome the brilliant young editor, writer, poetry performer, and academic, Ms Renae Prince, to our team. Ms Prince will be working alongside our already impressive team of editors - including Dr Copley, our new Senior editor - to develop new strategies for encouraging ever-more diversity in British publishing. She will be working on new acquisitions, as well as editing collections.

And, like the entire team, she will also handle some admin and pr - we all chip in at launches also, to help sell books! Eyewear views itself as a rich and multicultural family of authors, and editors, who are working together to redefine the symbiotic nature and shared values of community-aimed publishing. British publishing is woefully under-representative, and in a small way, we are proud to be doing what we can to shift forward. Fast.

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Eyewear Launches Patreon Campaign

Eyewear Launches Patreon Campaign

Good news, we have created a Patreon account for Eyewear. This is an easy and effective way to sign up patrons, who can help us thrive in challenging times, by pledging in exchange for books.

This is our fundraising moment. You know the good work Eyewear does, across the UK, Ireland, the USA and beyond, for poets old and young, new and established. Please spread the news, and really go for it. If every Eyewear ally signed up, and got someone else to sign up, we would be seeing a very rosy future.

https://www.patreon.com/eyewearpublishing Thank you so much!

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Cambridge Poet-in-residence Unlocks Larkin Mystery

Cambridge Poet-in-residence Unlocks Larkin Mystery

For many, Philip Larkin's 'The Whitsun Weddings' is one of the greatest of 20th century British poems.  Famously, it tells the story of a train journey, where the poetic speaker encounters numerous newlyweds. Images of fecundity and completion, as well as ritual and wounding, flesh out the poem. Until now, however, no one had noted the remarkable similarities between this seminal text, and an earlier poem by Noel Coward - until a Cambridge visiting fellow, doing research  at Pembroke College, spotted the affinities,  astonishing in their way.

Dr Todd Swift, currently at Pembroke (and director of Eyewear Publishing) says: 'Few recall that Coward wrote a lot of what he called verse - some songs, some light verse, and some poetry. His work had an impact on Larkin, in terms of imagery and style.'

The Coward poem in question is called 'Honeymoon 1905' (usually dated around 1907-1922, according to Barry Day) and is a long poem, about the length of Larkin's, and is a striking model for the later poem. It begins in Paddington train station, where a newlywed couple are preparing to board a train:

'They got into a train/ And, having settled themselves into a reserved carriage,/ Sought relief, with jokes and nervous laughter,/ From the sudden, frightening awareness of their marriage.'

Coward's poem continues to offer the themes Larkin adopted:

'Caught in the web their fate had spun/ They watched the suburbs sliding by,' and proceeds with images of countryside, suburban and pastoral, flashing by.

There is even a reference to rain. The poems are different, in that Larkin multiplied the couples, and Coward's poem, a little like 'On Chesil Beach' ends with the awkward couple alone, facing their first night together. This is clearly the template for one of Larkin's greatest works, and an exciting footnote in his estimable career.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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